The Hot Chicks Who Read dish on Sara Gruen’s At the Waters Edge

I am in a book club called the Hot Chicks Who Read.  I laugh as I write that because, if you asked any one of us if we were hot chicks, we’d say, No! It’s just a fun title, and it is.  Privately, however, I think each of us would agree, yeah, we’re hot, but we’ll laugh as we say it.  The group of 30-60 year olds meet every six weeks or so, and dish on a book we’ve picked for that months meeting.  Our choice of books have had hits and misses, but the one thing all of the choices have had in common is that the group of us have probably enjoyed talking about the books more than we have had actually reading them. We enjoyed the twist in Girl on a Train, loved the mystery and gossip in Big Little Lies, were very surprised at the Lesbian romance in The Paying Guest, and saw a few similarities in our own family and the disfunctional family we read about in The Vacationers.  At the Waters Edge, however, we all agreed was a hit.

The synopsis below is from saragruen.com:

Madeline Hyde, a young socialite from Philadelphia, reluctantly follows her husband and their best friend to the tiny village of Drumnadrochit in search of the Loch Ness monster—at the same time that a very real monster, Hitler, wages war against the Allied Forces. Despite German warplanes flying overhead and scarce food rations (and even scarcer stockings), what Maddie discovers—about the larger world and about herself—through the unlikely friendships she develops with the villagers, opens her eyes not only to the dark forces that exist around her but to the beauty and surprising possibilities as well.

The character of Maddie really resonated with each one of us. We all loved the growth that Maddie developed.  She turns from a young partying socialite into a rather naive young woman  who when traveling to Europe during the War has her eyes opened by the selfish, brash, and destructive behavior of her American companions in the face of struggle, honor and tragedy of the Scottish villagers she comes to love and respect.

I found it truly interesting when you have a group of women who all read the same book, the same words, and their life experiences let them view the same story in a different manner.  One friend was touched by the horror of Maddie’s struggle viewing the wounded taken onto the ship as they were crossing the Atlantic, and the shame she felt when her husband refused to go up on deck because he didn’t want to be faced with the reality of war.  Another friend, was struck by the scene at the inn when a soldier was beating Maddie’s friend for wearing stockings that he was sure she received from another man, and the fact that when Maddie ran out to say it was her that gave Annie the stockings, and the boyfriend kept swinging away.  I brought up the point that Maddie started cleaning her husbands and friends rooms, as well as her own because she was embarrassed over their selfish behavior. Each of these vignettes contributed to the moment that each of us realized that Maddie had changed from the selfish socialite to a human who wanted to make a difference in the lives of those villagers around her.  Where someone else became more important than she did herself. I realized, as we each came up with a “moment” for Maddie is that what she discovered about herself is what we all try to strive for within ourselves.  The whole becomes more important than the individual.

I’ll admit that the romantic storyline with Angus also reeled us in. At the end of our two hours we had enjoyed each other’s company and re-hashed a book that we could all agree was one of our favorites yet.

 ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

Copyright 2015 Deborah Kehoe all rights reserved.

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One thought on “The Hot Chicks Who Read dish on Sara Gruen’s At the Waters Edge

  1. Pingback: This Chick Read: Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll | A Chick Who Reads

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